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  • Free Earth Day celebration features fun, music, and education at The Oregon Garden

    Free Earth Day celebration features fun, music, and education at The Oregon Garden

    Date: 4/10/2018 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    Are you looking for a fun way to celebrate the upcoming 49th Annual Earth Day? Then head out to The Oregon Garden in Silverton for the 2018 Earth Day Fair.  It will take place on April 21, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  This is the only day of the year that admission to The Oregon Garden is free to all.

    The day will feature a number of earth-focused activities and presentations that include how to master backyard composting, drive an electric car, make your own reusable bag, and create your own seed starter pot. Visitors are invited to enjoy The Oregon Garden's 80-acre botanical garden featuring more than 20 specialty gardens.

    Educational exhibitors, along with several non-profit and student groups, will be located in the Garden's Grand Hall. The celebration highlights music from the Early College High School Emaa Da drumming band, Bush Elementary Marimba Band, and the Woodburn High School Mariachi Band.  Local food vendors will also offer a variety of tasty items for purchase.

    Free parking and shuttle service will be offered from the gravel lot north of Roth's Fresh Market in Silverton and free parking is offered at Robert Frost Elementary. On-site parking is available for $5.00.

    ​Visit www.oregongarden.org for additional details. The 2018 Earth Day Fair is presented by Marion County Public Works Environmental Services, Oregon Department of Energy, The Izaac Walton League, and The Oregon Garden.

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  • Commissioners present annual State of the County address

    Commissioners present annual State of the County address

    Date: 2/16/2018 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​On February 14, Oregon's 159th birthday, Commissioners Janet Carlson, Kevin Cameron, and Sam Brentano delivered their annual State of the County address to a packed house as part of SEDCOR's monthly economic business forum. The commissioners covered topics ranging from innovation and technology for agriculture, to infrastructure investments, public and mental health, public safety, and homelessness.

    Commissioner Brentano focused his remarks on forest policy and transportation. Affirming Marion County's support for a Third Bridge across the Willamette River, Brentano said, "The roads from Marion and Polk counties are necessary to get people and products to and from Salem and the rest of the world. This bridge has a regional impact and we believe it's necessary for this area to survive and thrive."

    Commissioner Cameron gave several examples of economic development initiatives in the Santiam Canyon, North Marion County, and Salem-Keizer. He also made the case for a dedicated patrol district in East Salem that would add ten deputies, stating, "This will free up deputies to serve our rural communities. Public safety always has to be our priority as elected officials."

    Commissioner Carlson's comments focused on public safety, homelessness, and mental health. As a community priority, Marion County allocates approximately 78 percent of the general fund budget to public safety services. The county is launching Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion to connect certain non-violent offenders with treatment, housing, and health services in lieu of jail, and is working alongside the Mid- Valley Community Action Agency and other community partners to open a shelter for runaway and homeless youth. Other new initiatives include Stepping Up which will divert mentally ill people from the county jail and pre-trial justice which will prioritize jail stays for those awaiting trial by their likelihood of appearing for court and safety risk to the community.

    Commissioner Carlson concluded her portion of the presentation by announcing her retirement at the end of her current term. She said, "This is the best job I've ever had. As a county commissioner, we can see the influence of the work that we do every day."

    The State of the County can be viewed on YouTube at http://bit.ly/2018StateoftheCounty or on the Board of Commissioners Facebook page (@MarionCountyBoard).

    The presentation will be replayed on Comcast channel 21 through February 26 at the following times:
    February 17 at 2:30 p.m.
    February 18 at 8:30 a.m.
    February 20 at 10:00 a.m.
    February 21 at 12:00 p.m.
    February 23 at 4:00 p.m.
    February 25 at 7:00 p.m.
    February 26 at 8:00 a.m.

    The State of the County kicks off the commissioners' annual community tour with town hall meetings throughout the county. The tour begins next week with a community meeting at the Mt. Angel Library on February 21 from noon to 1 p.m. The library is located at 290 E Charles St. in Mt. Angel. See our meetings and events​ list for a complete list of community forums. 

    For more information about State of the County or Marion County's programs and services, visit our website at www.co.marion.or.us contact the Board of Commissioners Office at (503) 588-5212 or commissioners@co.marion.or.us. ​

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  • Officials stand up to child abuse and neglect

    Officials stand up to child abuse and neglect

    Date: 4/4/2018 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Community Services

    ​Officials stand up to child abuse & neglect for National Child Abuse Prevention Month

    Marion County Child Abuse Prevention Team stands together to combat abuse and neglect

     Local and state officials will gather with community members to kick-off National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This event, hosted by the Marion County Child Abuse Prevention Team, will feature prominent speakers communicating the part we all play in preventing child abuse and neglect and promoting well-being. Following the program, community members and speakers will plant a pinwheel garden to help visualize and honor our most vulnerable community members.

    Nationally, five children every day die from abuse and neglect. In Oregon, there were 11,843 founded cases of abuse or neglect in 2016. Of those cases, 1,255 were victims in Marion County. Everyone has a role to play in making Oregon a safe and healthy place for children and families.

    SPEAKERS:
    Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson
    Marion County Commissioner Kevin Cameron
    Oregon Department of Human Services Child Welfare Director Marilyn Jones
    Marion County Deputy District Attorney Paige Clarkson
    Leslie Middle School Students – Hands & Words Are Not For Hurting Project

    WHAT:           
    Child Abuse Prevention Rally

    WHEN:           
    April 6, 2018, at 10:00 a.m.

    WHERE:          
    Oregon State Capitol Front Steps
    900 Court Street NE, Salem

    The public and media are invited to attend.

    For more information about Child Abuse Prevention Month activities and how to combat child abuse, visit www.parentforthefuture.com.  

    The Marion County Child Abuse Prevention Committee includes representatives from: Blue Ribbon Brigade, Boys and Girls Club, Catholic Community Services, CASA of Marion County, Salem Police Department, Family Building Blocks, Liberty House, H.O.M.E. Youth & Resource Center, Liberty House, Marion County Community Services, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Marion and Polk Early Learning Hub, Options Counseling and Family Services, Oregon Department of Human Services, Salem Keizer Public Schools Hands and Words are not for Hurting Project, Shangra-La, Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, and YMCA. ​

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  • Kratom linked to multi-state salmonella outbreak

    Kratom linked to multi-state salmonella outbreak

    Date: 4/6/2018 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    ​As of March 23, 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is reporting a total of 87 people in 35 states infected with Salmonella related to kratom consumption dating back as far as January of 2017. There have been eight cases reported in Oregon to date including a case in Polk County and a case in Marion County. 

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical plant in the coffee tree family. It grows naturally in many areas of Southeast Asia including Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea. It has stimulant and opioid-like properties and is consumed for its stimulant effects, as pain treatment, and as an opioid substitute.

    It appears that many different kratom products have been contaminated with a variety of different Salmonella strains and no common supplier has been linked to the contamination. According to the CDC, 39 percent of ill people have been hospitalized. There have been no deaths associated with the outbreak as of this time.

     Advice to consumers

    • At this time, CDC recommends that people not consume any brand of kratom in any form because it could be contaminated with Salmonella and could make people sick.
      • No common brands or suppliers have been identified;
      • Kratom is sold in many forms, including as leaves, pills, capsules, powder, and tea; and
      • Kratom is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketom, and Biak.
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration website has a list of kratom products that have tested positive for Salmonella contamination.
    • Contact a health care provider if you think you got sick from consuming kratom.
      • Most people infected with Salmonella develop the following signs and symptoms 12-72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria:
        • Diarrhea
        • Fever
        • Abdominal cramps
    • Talk to your health care provider before taking any supplement, especially if you are in a group more likely to get a severe Salmonella infection. People in the following groups are more likely to get a severe Salmonella infection:
      • People with weakened immune systems, including people who are receiving chemotherapy or have HIV
      • Pregnant women
      • Children younger than 5 years
      • Older adults

     For more information, please visit the CDC​ or FDA websites.

    Read More
  • Addiction treatment program moving to new location

    Addiction treatment program moving to new location

    Date: 3/15/2018 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    ​Marion County Health & Human Services Addiction Treatment program is excited to announce the relocation of services to 2045 Silverton Rd NE, in Salem. The program provides adolescent and adult outpatient addiction treatment services, medication assisted treatment, and mentor services.

    The last day of services at the current building located at 2035 and 2166 Davcor Ct. will be Thursday, March 15. The move out of those buildings will take place over the weekend of March 15-17. The Addiction Treatment Services program will open its doors for business at the new location on Monday, March 19.​

    Read More
 

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  • Apr
    15

    SHOOTING LEAVES TWO DEAD AND ANOTHER INJURED **UPDATE 2** (PHOTO)

    Posted by: Sheriff's Office

    Deputies are currently seeking any information regarding the pictured vehicle. Originally thought to be a Cadillac Escalade investigators now believe they are searching for a late model red or maroon Ford Expedition. If you have any information regarding this vehicle or its owner please call MCSO at 503 540 8079

    ********************

    Deputies have identified both men killed in yesterday's shootings that occurred in the parking lots at Bar Fly's located at 444 Lancaster Drive NE and near 421 Lancaster Drive NE, in Salem. They are Tobias Helms-Reese, age 24, of Salem and Tyler Longacre, age 21, of Salem. Autopsies were performed on both men by the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office. For both men it was determined that the cause of death was from a gunshot wound.

    Detectives are continuing to investigate the shootings. As this is an ongoing investigation, the Sheriff’s Office will not offer any further details at this time.

    The Sheriff’s Office is still asking anyone with information to please call or tip line at 503 540 8079.

    *************************

    A late night shooting has left two men dead and another man injured. April 14th, 2018 at 2:28 a.m., deputies were called to Bar Fly’s located at 444 Lancaster Drive NE on a reported shooting.

    When deputies arrived they found two men shot, both men were taken to area hospitals for treatment. Sadly at the hospital one of the men succumbed to his injuries and died, the second man remains in stable condition. A short time later a third man was found deceased in the parking lot of DaVita located at 421 Lancaster Drive NE.

    Investigators believe all three men are related to the same incident. Detectives are currently on scene and are working diligently to determine exactly what happened. Investigators are seeking information you may have about a red Cadillac Escalade seen leaving the area at the time of the shooting. If you have any information or details surrounding the shooting please call our tip line at 503 540 8079.

    The Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by the Salem Police Department, Keizer Police Department, Marion County District Attorney’s Office and the Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office.

    **Media this is a very active investigation and there are no additional details available at this time. A PIO is currently available on scene. If your are responding to the scene please utilize the Road House parking lot to stage any vehicles and equipment. **

     

    Contact Info:
    Primary PIO Phone: 503. 584. MCSO (6276)
    Public Information Officer Lt. Chris Baldridge
    Cell Phone: 503.930.0579
    Email: cbaldridge@co.marion.or.us
    On Twitter: @MCSOInTheKnow
    www.Facebook.com/MCSOInTheKnow
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    SHOOTING LEAVES TWO DEAD AND ANOTHER INJURED **UPDATE 2** (PHOTO)
  • Apr
    13

    MAN RESCUED AFTER FALL (HENLINE FALLS TRAIL) (PHOTO)

    Posted by: Sheriff's Office

    News Release from Marion Co. Sheriff's Office
    Posted on FlashAlert: April 13th, 2018 5:53 PM

    Today around, 11:00 a.m., Marion County Deputies, a U.S. Forest Service Ranger and fire personnel were called after a 64 year old Florida man fell some fifty feet down an embankment into Henline Creek. The man was hiking with his son on the Henline Falls Trail near the North Fork road in the Willamette National Forest when he fell.

    Rescue crews from Gates Fire, Stayton Fire, Salem Fire and Lyons Ambulance hiked in approximately one mile and extracted the male from the creek. In all twenty emergency responders assisted in the rescue. The man was transported to the Santiam Hospital for treatment of his injuries.

     

    Contact Info:
    Primary PIO Phone: 503. 584. MCSO (6276)
    Public Information Officer Lt. Chris Baldridge
    Cell Phone: 503.930.0579
    Email: cbaldridge@co.marion.or.us
    On Twitter: @MCSOInTheKnow
    www.Facebook.com/MCSOInTheKnow
    Read More
    MAN RESCUED AFTER FALL (HENLINE FALLS TRAIL) (PHOTO)
  • Apr
    13

    DEPUTIES SEARCHING FOR MISSING MAN (SUBLIMITY) ***UPDATE***

    Posted by: Sheriff's Office

    News Release from Marion Co. Sheriff's Office
    Posted on FlashAlert: April 13th, 2018 5:08 PM

    Deputies have learned that Mr. Ingalls has been found safe near the Tacoma Washington area. He was located by a motorist who saw social media postings. The motorists directed the Washington State Police who eventually stopped Mr. Ingalls. They are now working with family to return Mr. Ingalls home safely.

    MCSO would like to thank the motorists and the Washington State Police for their incredible efforts to bring Mr. Ingalls home safely.

    **************************

    Marion County deputies are searching for Robert Ingalls, age 82 after he left his Sublimity home yesterday evening. Mr. Ingalls recently moved to an assisted living facility from Washington and may be headed to the Bellevue Washington area or possibly California. Mr. Ingalls suffers from dementia like symptoms and requires medication.

    He is a white male adult, who stands 6’03” tall, weighs 285 pounds, with blue eyes and a bald head. Mr. Ingalls was last seen wearing a blue denim shirt, blue docker pants, a gray jacket and black shoes. Mr. Ingalls is driving his 2002 Chevrolet, crew cab ,truck. The truck is tan with a matching canopy and Washington vanity plates YSREBOB. The vehicle is in excellent condition and has a NHRA sticker prominently displayed on the rear portion of the canopy.

    Mr. Ingalls does not have a cellular phone and his current location in unknown. If you see Mr. Ingalls or his vehicle please keep him in sight and call your local law enforcement immediately.

    Contact Info:
    Primary PIO Phone: 503. 584. MCSO (6276)
    Public Information Officer Lt. Chris Baldridge
    Cell Phone: 503.930.0579
    Email: cbaldridge@co.marion.or.us
    On Twitter: @MCSOInTheKnow
    www.Facebook.com/MCSOInTheKnow
    Read More
    DEPUTIES SEARCHING FOR MISSING MAN (SUBLIMITY) ***UPDATE***
  • Apr
    10

    Free Earth Day celebration features fun, music, and education at The Oregon Garden

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    Are you looking for a fun way to celebrate the upcoming 49th Annual Earth Day? Then head out to The Oregon Garden in Silverton for the 2018 Earth Day Fair.  It will take place on April 21, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  This is the only day of the year that admission to The Oregon Garden is free to all.

    The day will feature a number of earth-focused activities and presentations that include how to master backyard composting, drive an electric car, make your own reusable bag, and create your own seed starter pot. Visitors are invited to enjoy The Oregon Garden's 80-acre botanical garden featuring more than 20 specialty gardens.

    Educational exhibitors, along with several non-profit and student groups, will be located in the Garden's Grand Hall. The celebration highlights music from the Early College High School Emaa Da drumming band, Bush Elementary Marimba Band, and the Woodburn High School Mariachi Band.  Local food vendors will also offer a variety of tasty items for purchase.

    Free parking and shuttle service will be offered from the gravel lot north of Roth's Fresh Market in Silverton and free parking is offered at Robert Frost Elementary. On-site parking is available for $5.00.

    ​Visit www.oregongarden.org for additional details. The 2018 Earth Day Fair is presented by Marion County Public Works Environmental Services, Oregon Department of Energy, The Izaac Walton League, and The Oregon Garden.

    Read More
    Free Earth Day celebration features fun, music, and education at The Oregon Garden
  • Apr
    7

    DEPUTIES INVESTIGATING POSSIBLE TRAIN VERSUS PEDESTRIAN CRASH (JEFFERSON)

    Posted by: Sheriff's Office

    ​News Release from Marion Co. Sheriff's Office
    Posted on FlashAlert: April 7th, 2018 9:48 PM

    Deputies, fire personell and rail officals have searched the area throughly and cannot locate any evidence that a crash occurred. The train has proceeded to its destination and all emergency personell have cleared the scene. Deputies are asking anyone with information to please call 503 588 5032.

    ***********************

    Marion County deputies and railroad officials are scouring the area of 3rd and Union Streets in Jefferson. Tonight at around 9:00 p.m. a freight train traveling in the area reported a person in a gray hooded sweatshirt sitting on the tracks as the train passed through.

    It is currently unknown if the person was struck or moved off of the tracks prior to being struck. The train is stopped in the area now and a search effort is underway. Deputies are asking anyone who may have been in the area at the time and witnessed the incident to please call 503 588 5032.

    There are no images available at this time and this story will be updated as information becomes availble.

    Contact Info:
    Primary PIO Phone: 503. 584. MCSO (6276)
    Public Information Officer Lt. Chris Baldridge
    Cell Phone: 503.930.0579
    Email: cbaldridge@co.marion.or.us
    On Twitter: @MCSOInTheKnow
    www.Facebook.com/MCSOInTheKnow
    Read More
    DEPUTIES INVESTIGATING POSSIBLE TRAIN VERSUS PEDESTRIAN CRASH (JEFFERSON)
  • Apr
    6

    Kratom linked to multi-state salmonella outbreak

    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    ​As of March 23, 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is reporting a total of 87 people in 35 states infected with Salmonella related to kratom consumption dating back as far as January of 2017. There have been eight cases reported in Oregon to date including a case in Polk County and a case in Marion County. 

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical plant in the coffee tree family. It grows naturally in many areas of Southeast Asia including Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea. It has stimulant and opioid-like properties and is consumed for its stimulant effects, as pain treatment, and as an opioid substitute.

    It appears that many different kratom products have been contaminated with a variety of different Salmonella strains and no common supplier has been linked to the contamination. According to the CDC, 39 percent of ill people have been hospitalized. There have been no deaths associated with the outbreak as of this time.

     Advice to consumers

    • At this time, CDC recommends that people not consume any brand of kratom in any form because it could be contaminated with Salmonella and could make people sick.
      • No common brands or suppliers have been identified;
      • Kratom is sold in many forms, including as leaves, pills, capsules, powder, and tea; and
      • Kratom is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketom, and Biak.
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration website has a list of kratom products that have tested positive for Salmonella contamination.
    • Contact a health care provider if you think you got sick from consuming kratom.
      • Most people infected with Salmonella develop the following signs and symptoms 12-72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria:
        • Diarrhea
        • Fever
        • Abdominal cramps
    • Talk to your health care provider before taking any supplement, especially if you are in a group more likely to get a severe Salmonella infection. People in the following groups are more likely to get a severe Salmonella infection:
      • People with weakened immune systems, including people who are receiving chemotherapy or have HIV
      • Pregnant women
      • Children younger than 5 years
      • Older adults

     For more information, please visit the CDC​ or FDA websites.

    Read More
    Kratom linked to multi-state salmonella outbreak
  • Apr
    4

    Officials stand up to child abuse and neglect

    Posted by: Community Services

    ​Officials stand up to child abuse & neglect for National Child Abuse Prevention Month

    Marion County Child Abuse Prevention Team stands together to combat abuse and neglect

     Local and state officials will gather with community members to kick-off National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This event, hosted by the Marion County Child Abuse Prevention Team, will feature prominent speakers communicating the part we all play in preventing child abuse and neglect and promoting well-being. Following the program, community members and speakers will plant a pinwheel garden to help visualize and honor our most vulnerable community members.

    Nationally, five children every day die from abuse and neglect. In Oregon, there were 11,843 founded cases of abuse or neglect in 2016. Of those cases, 1,255 were victims in Marion County. Everyone has a role to play in making Oregon a safe and healthy place for children and families.

    SPEAKERS:
    Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson
    Marion County Commissioner Kevin Cameron
    Oregon Department of Human Services Child Welfare Director Marilyn Jones
    Marion County Deputy District Attorney Paige Clarkson
    Leslie Middle School Students – Hands & Words Are Not For Hurting Project

    WHAT:           
    Child Abuse Prevention Rally

    WHEN:           
    April 6, 2018, at 10:00 a.m.

    WHERE:          
    Oregon State Capitol Front Steps
    900 Court Street NE, Salem

    The public and media are invited to attend.

    For more information about Child Abuse Prevention Month activities and how to combat child abuse, visit www.parentforthefuture.com.  

    The Marion County Child Abuse Prevention Committee includes representatives from: Blue Ribbon Brigade, Boys and Girls Club, Catholic Community Services, CASA of Marion County, Salem Police Department, Family Building Blocks, Liberty House, H.O.M.E. Youth & Resource Center, Liberty House, Marion County Community Services, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Marion and Polk Early Learning Hub, Options Counseling and Family Services, Oregon Department of Human Services, Salem Keizer Public Schools Hands and Words are not for Hurting Project, Shangra-La, Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, and YMCA. ​

    Read More
    Officials stand up to child abuse and neglect
  • Apr
    2

    Creating employment opportunities for people with disabilities

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    This article appears in the April 2018 edition (page 25) of the Salem Business Journal. ​

    ​By Dick Hughes, special to Marion County

    Don Gay was focused on his tasks, reluctant even to pause for a photograph or quick conversation.

    It was the lunch-hour rush at an Arby's restaurant in Salem. Don was wiping down the tables and chairs, clearing away the trash and keeping the customer area clean.

    "Good job. Makes me happy," Don said.

    Don Gay, 51, is among the more than 2,900 Marion County residents who experience an intellectual or developmental disability – I/DD.

    Like Don, many want to work; to earn a paycheck, even when it's only a few hours a week; and to have the sense of pride, accomplishment and self-worth that comes from having a job.

    "The clients are so happy when they find a job. They just glow," said Betty Fennell, who is part of the Job Development Team for Goodwill Industries of the Columbia Willamette. "It's amazing how much they can do when given a chance."

    Under the state's Employment First policy, Oregon has shifted from employment in sheltered workshops to jobs in the larger community where they can earn the minimum wage or more.

    It can be challenging to find enough employers who recognize why hiring such individuals is good for business. This is one reason why the Marion County Board of Commissioners proclaimed March 2018 as "Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month.

    More than 300 individuals with I/DD receiving services from Marion County are employed in the community, according to Program Manager Corissa Neufeldt. More would like to.

    "We're hoping people will realize we have an untapped workforce," Neufeldt said. "This is not charity."

    They are stable employees, not looking to move on to the next job. They can find enjoyment in repetitive tasks that other workers find boring, such as copying paperwork in an office, folding towels and napkins or, in Don's case, keeping a restaurant tidy. That frees their co-workers for other tasks.

    People with I/DD don't necessarily fit traditional job descriptions. The key is creating a niche that benefits both the employee and the employer: "Looking at employment in creative ways that meet business needs and also our clients' needs," Neufeldt said. "We've seen many success stories in our community and encourage businesses to consider employing people who experience an intellectual or developmental disability."

    The clients' participation in the workplace often improves workplace morale. In addition, customers see the business as empathetic, which enhances its reputation.

    Betty helped Don find his job, and Goodwill provides his job coach, Tim Kronser.

    Job coaches help the employee and the employer adapt and work through any obstacles that come up. The coaches make sure the employee learns, understands and follows the job tasks.

    "After that, it's letting Don be as independent as he can be," said Tim, whose goal is to gradually fade into the background.

    As with any restaurant employee, Don must follow strict cleanliness and safety standards. Tim worked with Don to obtain his food-handler card, and he is at Arby's for each of Don's two-hour shifts.

    Don, who lives in an adult foster care home in Salem, takes CherryLift to and from work. Wearing his Arby's apron, cap and nametag, he always arrives early so he has time to get ready.

    The staff notices his dependability and timeliness.

    "He just keeps busy. All the tables are beautiful. All the chairs are beautiful. He details the backs of the chairs and everything," Arby's shift manager Bernice Schwartz said. 

    "We all like him."

    For more information about Marion County's Intellectual and Developmental Disability program or to inquire about offering employment opportunities for I/DD individuals, please contact Corissa Neufeldt at (503) 763-5787 or cneufeldt@co.marion.or.us. ​

    Read More
    Creating employment opportunities for people with disabilities
  • Mar
    16

    DEPUTIES SEEKING PUBLIC'S HELP IN LOCATING MISSING WOODBURN WOMAN

    Posted by: Sheriff's Office

    News Release from Marion Co. Sheriff's Office
    Posted on FlashAlert: March 16th, 2018 10:07 PM

    Deputies with the Marion County Sheriff's Office are searching for 31 year old, Jessica Chipman of Woodburn. Jessica was last seen Sunday March 11th when she left her home on Chateau Drive in Woodburn.

    Ms. Chipman suffers from mental illness and has left for extended periods of time in the past. Ms. Chipman is a white, adult, female who stands 5' 06" tall, weighing 145 pounds. Ms Chipman has long brown hair that is dyed blonde and hazel eyes. Ms. Chipman requires medication and may be headed toward the Portland area.

    The Sheriff's Office is asking anyone with information regarding Ms. Chipman to please contact their local law enforcement agency.
    Contact Info:
    Primary PIO Phone: 503. 584. MCSO (6276)
    Public Information Officer Lt. Chris Baldridge
    Cell Phone: 503.930.0579
    Email: cbaldridge@co.marion.or.us
    On Twitter: @MCSOInTheKnow
    www.Facebook.com/MCSOInTheKnow
    Read More
    DEPUTIES SEEKING PUBLIC'S HELP IN LOCATING MISSING WOODBURN WOMAN
  • Mar
    15

    Addiction treatment program moving to new location

    Posted by: Health and Human Services

    ​Marion County Health & Human Services Addiction Treatment program is excited to announce the relocation of services to 2045 Silverton Rd NE, in Salem. The program provides adolescent and adult outpatient addiction treatment services, medication assisted treatment, and mentor services.

    The last day of services at the current building located at 2035 and 2166 Davcor Ct. will be Thursday, March 15. The move out of those buildings will take place over the weekend of March 15-17. The Addiction Treatment Services program will open its doors for business at the new location on Monday, March 19.​

    Read More
    Addiction treatment program moving to new location
  • Mar
    15

    Commissioners seek solutions for rural solar farms

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​Proponents and opponents of photovoltaic solar arrays, or solar farms, filled the Senator Hearing Room Wednesday to express opinions on potential changes to the county's Rural Zone Code. Following yesterday's public hearing, staff will work with the Marion County Planning Commission to gather stakeholders from both sides to come up with proposals to regulate solar farms to protect the Willamette Valley's high-value farmland. The commissioners placed a moratorium on solar farm applications until new standards are proposed.

    Marion County began receiving conditional use applications to site photovoltaic solar power facilities in farm zones in 2015. To date, the county has approved 17 sites covering 205 acres. All but one of these sites is composed primarily of high-value farm soils.  People contacted the county with concerns about allowing solar farms on properties that are actively being farmed, particularly farms with higher quality soils. In response, the commissioners are considering additional standards.

    Several people who testified at the hearing requested a work group to revisit the proposed standards. After the ordinance imposing the moratorium is adopted next Wednesday, the county will not accept new solar array applications. The commissioners directed the work group to complete its work before October 1.

    For more information, contact the Marion County Planning Division at (503) 588-5038 or email planning@co.marion.or.us. ​

    Read More
    Commissioners seek solutions for rural solar farms
  • Mar
    1

    Recycling Reset - Curbside recycling changes

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    ​Marion County is hitting the reset button on its popular curbside recycling program.  This means residents won't be able to recycle some plastics and other items after March 5. The reset is due to the global recycling crisis caused by China's crackdown on imported recyclable materials.

    "To put the problem in perspective, it's helpful to understand that China has for many years consumed over half of the world's recyclable materials," said David Lear, Mid-Valley Garbage & Recycling General Manager. "However, a significant amount of the recycled material China was getting was contaminated with food waste, garbage, and other unusable materials."

    As of January 1, 2018, China made good on its promise to significantly limit the amount of material it imports from other countries. The ban created a major disruption in recycling and there is no excess capacity in worldwide recycling markets to absorb the material China no longer accepts. This leaves Marion County recycling processors, as well as other jurisdictions, with a lot of material and few markets.

    Will Posegate, Garten Services Chief Operating Officer, said, "Given that this shakeup in global recycling markets is likely to continue for the near future, we have identified a short list of materials for which we know there are markets, both global and domestic. Our goal is to make sure that collected recyclable material is marketable and will actually be recycled and not end up in a landfill in some other part of the world. If manufacturers aren't buying certain materials, we have no choice but to throw them away."

    Mixed Recycling Roll Cart – Approved items  

    1. Paper

      • Newspaper, including advertisements and paper inserts

      • Corrugated cardboard

      • Magazines and catalogs

      • Junk/Direct mail

      • Boxes — cereal, cracker, cookie and shoe boxes

      • Office paper — copier and printer paper, file folders, note paper, computer paper, brochures

    2. Metal

      • Steel (tin) cans

      • ​Aluminum cans

    3. Plastic – Bottles and Jugs only — clean with lids removed

      • ​​Beverage bottles (soda, water, juice); 12 ounces or larger only

      • ​Other bottles — soap, household cleaning solutions

      • ​​Jugs — milk, juice, detergent

    In our zeal to protect the planet, we've all put something in the mixed recycling roll cart and hoped that it will be recycled.  This "wishful" recycling is a part of the problem. Removing items that are not on this list will play a role in the solution. Cleaning up our recycling is a community issue that not only involves putting the right material in the mixed recycling roll cart, but making sure items are empty, clean and dry – when in doubt, throw it out.

    Marion County Environmental Services, the City of Salem, local garbage haulers and recycling processors recognize that changing the curbside program requires thoughtful re-education about contamination and materials that are no longer considered "recyclable." Customers will soon receive new recycling educational materials.

    "In making these changes to the countywide mixed recycling roll cart program, we hope to enable our customers to recycle items for which there are sustainable, accessible, and affordable markets – now and into the future," said Brian May, Marion County Environmental Services Manager. "Despite the current challenges in the recycling realm, Marion County remains committed to protecting the health and welfare of our residents by providing environmentally sound solid waste management services."

    For more information, contact the Mid-Valley Garbage and Recycling Association at (503) 390-4000 or visit mrtrashrecycles.com or Marion County Environmental Services at www.mcrecycles.net​ or email EnvironmentalServices@co.marion.or.us.  ​

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    Recycling Reset - Curbside recycling changes
  • Feb
    16

    Commissioners present annual State of the County address

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​On February 14, Oregon's 159th birthday, Commissioners Janet Carlson, Kevin Cameron, and Sam Brentano delivered their annual State of the County address to a packed house as part of SEDCOR's monthly economic business forum. The commissioners covered topics ranging from innovation and technology for agriculture, to infrastructure investments, public and mental health, public safety, and homelessness.

    Commissioner Brentano focused his remarks on forest policy and transportation. Affirming Marion County's support for a Third Bridge across the Willamette River, Brentano said, "The roads from Marion and Polk counties are necessary to get people and products to and from Salem and the rest of the world. This bridge has a regional impact and we believe it's necessary for this area to survive and thrive."

    Commissioner Cameron gave several examples of economic development initiatives in the Santiam Canyon, North Marion County, and Salem-Keizer. He also made the case for a dedicated patrol district in East Salem that would add ten deputies, stating, "This will free up deputies to serve our rural communities. Public safety always has to be our priority as elected officials."

    Commissioner Carlson's comments focused on public safety, homelessness, and mental health. As a community priority, Marion County allocates approximately 78 percent of the general fund budget to public safety services. The county is launching Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion to connect certain non-violent offenders with treatment, housing, and health services in lieu of jail, and is working alongside the Mid- Valley Community Action Agency and other community partners to open a shelter for runaway and homeless youth. Other new initiatives include Stepping Up which will divert mentally ill people from the county jail and pre-trial justice which will prioritize jail stays for those awaiting trial by their likelihood of appearing for court and safety risk to the community.

    Commissioner Carlson concluded her portion of the presentation by announcing her retirement at the end of her current term. She said, "This is the best job I've ever had. As a county commissioner, we can see the influence of the work that we do every day."

    The State of the County can be viewed on YouTube at http://bit.ly/2018StateoftheCounty or on the Board of Commissioners Facebook page (@MarionCountyBoard).

    The presentation will be replayed on Comcast channel 21 through February 26 at the following times:
    February 17 at 2:30 p.m.
    February 18 at 8:30 a.m.
    February 20 at 10:00 a.m.
    February 21 at 12:00 p.m.
    February 23 at 4:00 p.m.
    February 25 at 7:00 p.m.
    February 26 at 8:00 a.m.

    The State of the County kicks off the commissioners' annual community tour with town hall meetings throughout the county. The tour begins next week with a community meeting at the Mt. Angel Library on February 21 from noon to 1 p.m. The library is located at 290 E Charles St. in Mt. Angel. See our meetings and events​ list for a complete list of community forums. 

    For more information about State of the County or Marion County's programs and services, visit our website at www.co.marion.or.us contact the Board of Commissioners Office at (503) 588-5212 or commissioners@co.marion.or.us. ​

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    Commissioners present annual State of the County address
  • Feb
    9

    St. Louis Fish Ponds Park to open for the season

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    ​GERVAIS, OR - Marion County Parks announces that St. Louis Fish Ponds Park will open for the season on March 1, 2018.

    St. Louis Fish Ponds is located thirteen miles north of Keizer and is a popular warm water fishing and dog training destination. The park has a concrete pathway to the fishing sites, as well as ADA accessible restrooms and picnic tables, and is open daily from 8:00 a.m. to sunset.

    For more information, please call 503-588-5036 or visit the Marion County Parks web site at http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Parks/Pages/default.aspx.

    For information about fishing and gun use at the park, please contact the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife at 503-947-6100.

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    St. Louis Fish Ponds Park to open for the season
  • Jan
    18

    Members Needed for the Special Districts Budget Committee

    Posted by: Public Works

    ​Are you a resident of the Brooks Community Service District, the Fargo Interchange Service District, or the Labish Village Sewage & Drainage District? Would you like a chance to speak up and share your thoughts or ideas on how to make your community a better place to live? Marion County is seeking volunteers for vacant positions on these three advisory boards to provide a voice for community issues and approve the annual budget for each district.

    The Special Districts Budget Committee meets with the Marion County Board of Commissioners, acting as the governing body to each of these three separate districts, to advise the governing body of issues concerning each district. Members are appointed by the Marion County Board of Commissioners to serve three-year terms and must live within the district served. Commitment requires attendance at scheduled meetings and public hearings and participation in discussions involving each district.

    Application forms are available at Marion County Business Services, located at 555 Court Street NE, Fourth Floor, Salem, Oregon, or online at http://www.co.marion.or.us/BS/VOL/Pages/default.aspx. Applicants must be at least 18 years old and a resident of the District. For more information or to receive an application by mail, contact Roxanne Fleming, Service Districts, at (503) 588-5084 or by e-mail at rfleming@co.marion.or.us.

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    Members Needed for the Special Districts Budget Committee
  • Jan
    9

    Dog Shelter seeking dog foster care homes

    Posted by: Community Services - Dog Services

    ​Marion County Dog Shelter is currently recruiting for volunteer dog foster care homes. Foster care home volunteers are taught to feed, groom, socialize, train, and medicate the dogs – all from the comfort of their own homes. Fosters are given all of the supplies needed to care for the foster dog including medical supplies, food, leashes, bowls, toys, and more.  "Providing a foster home is one of the best things you can do to help stray dogs. Fostering a dog not only helps with the future adoption of the animal, it also helps free up kennel space for other dogs in need," said Ashleigh Young, Foster Care Coordinator.

    Some of the most common reasons dogs are sent to foster care are minor medical issues such as skin problems requiring daily medication, additional training needs, or nervous behavior in the shelter environment. When the animal is ready to be adopted, the shelter will post the dog's story and photographs on the shelter website and actively seek to find a loving home. Foster providers are also welcome to participate in outreach events.

    Foster care homes must be able to provide a safe, caring, and stable environment for the foster dog. Fostering can be a great opportunity for those that wish to volunteer, but feel they don't have time for a more traditional volunteer role. Fostering allows flexibility, takes place in your own home, and is something the whole family can be involved in.

    To sign-up or learn more about the Marion County Dog Shelter foster care program, contact Foster Care Coordinator Ashleigh Young at (503) 316-6698 or email mcdsfosterdogs@co.marion.or.us. ​

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    Dog Shelter seeking dog foster care homes
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