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  • North Fork Park is closed due to snow

    North Fork Park is closed due to snow

    Date: 1/14/2020 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    ​MEHAMA, OR – Marion County Parks announces that North Fork Park has closed due to the recent snow storm. The park, which is located on North Fork Road in the Santiam Canyon, has received several inches of snow during the storm and will remain closed until further notice.  

    For more information about this and other Marion County Parks, visit the website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Parks/, email parks@co.marion.or.us, or call 503-588-5036.

    Read More
  • Veteran Service Office making a difference for local veterans

    Veteran Service Office making a difference for local veterans

    Date: 1/7/2020 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​This article appears in the January 2020 issue of Salem Business Journal. 

    By Dick Hughes, special to Marion County

    James Riddle tells the story of a Marion County veteran whose claim for federal health benefits had been denied.

    As a military police officer, the man wore a duty belt that was quite heavy. He later developed leg issues but the VA contended his condition did not stem from his military service.

    Riddle, the lead veterans service officer (VSO) for Marion County, dug into the science and found scientific research that backed the veteran's claim. The VA accepted the claim. Two weeks later, another VSO in the Marion County Veteran Service Office also used that research to back a veteran's claim.

    "We work outside the boxes," Riddle said. "We try to connect things that others have missed."

    The result is a powerful collaboration that has brought millions of dollars to veterans, families and survivors since the office opened in June 2018.

    "The county commissioners are dedicated to making sure the veterans in Marion County are served. They are committed to this program being successful," said Lisa Trauernicht, a senior policy analyst with the Board of Commissioners.

    It's a busy office, starting with two VSOs and adding a third. The staff met with an average of 100 veterans a week during the last half of 2019, they already plan to expand their outreach, especially in the Santiam Canyon.

    Trauernicht helps oversee the county's contract with Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency, which runs the program and employs the staff. "They are an immensely dedicated, passionate group of people," she said. "Their stories are amazing."

    Sara Webb is Community Action's program manager. The staff members are veterans: VSOs Tim Boykin, Army; Eddie Grainger, Marines; and Riddle, both Navy and Army; and veteran service specialist Chris Dyer, Air Force.

    Marion was the last county to get its own office. The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs, through its headquarters in Salem, historically had served the capital area.

    Working with government but not being "of the government" can be an advantage at times. Riddle encountered a veteran who'd never applied for benefits because the last time he entered a government building, he was sent to Vietnam. But he accepted Riddle's assistance.

    Services are free. They include filing disability claims; filing for pensions; obtaining military records; and applying for VA health care, education, and surviving spouse benefits. However, the office is not involved in setting up VA medical appointments or anything like that.

    Grainger said some veterans fear that applying for mental health benefits will affect their ability to get a job. That is not the case and, he said, it is OK to get help.

    The benefits can be life-changing, whether money to pay for hearing aids, for medical treatment or for long-term care. Yet many veterans, especially women, don't realize they are veterans and potentially eligible for benefits. When discharged, many servicemembers were misinformed about their status.

    "We encourage every veteran to check," Boykin said. "It's that question that goes unanswered if you never ask."

    A lot well-intended but inaccurate information circulates via social media and elsewhere. Webb stresses the best place to get up-to-date answers is a county veterans service office. To be certified by the ODVA, every county VSO must undergo a year of training. And stay constantly attuned.

    "There's a lot. The VA changes almost daily. I thought I knew what I was getting myself into when I started," Riddle said. "The analogy I use is, I'm out in left field, I'm ready to play, I got my hat, I got my glove – but we're playing hockey. That's the difference from going from client to officer. It's a completely different game."

    But that knowledge is powerful. From January 2018 through mid-December 2019, the VSOs helped Marion County veterans claim new monthly awards of $1,680,969.50 and retroactive awards of $4,077,633.52.

    "I spent 20 years serving in the Marine Corps and serving my country," Grainger said, "and it's nice that I'm in a role where I can still serve."

    -----------

    Location & Hours

    Veteran Service Office of Marion County
    780 Commercial St. SE, Ste. 302, Salem, OR
    (971) 707-4400
    info.vso@mwvcaa.org 

    Office hours
    Walk-in service: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday:  9 -11 a.m., 1- 4p.m.
    Thursday-Friday: Only front desk staff is available

    Off-site locations
    First working Monday of the month: Woodburn Estates & Golf, 1776 Country Club Rd., Woodburn, OR 97071
    Third working Monday of the month: Santiam Outreach Community Center, 280 NE Santiam Blvd., Mill City, OR 97360

    What to bring to your first visit, if possible:
    DD214 form
    Photos showing where you served
    Medical records
    Diagnosis of any sort

    Read More
  • Construction project will bring improvements to 45th Avenue

    Construction project will bring improvements to 45th Avenue

    Date: 12/20/2019 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Public Works

    ​SALEM OR – Marion County has contracted Carter & Company to begin construction on 45th Avenue beginning January 13, 2020. The project will be constructed in several stages and is estimated to be completed in 2021.

    The project will widen the road to accommodate bike lanes, add a turn lane at Fire Protection Way, construct missing sidewalk sections and ramps, and upgrade the stormwater system.  Once construction is complete, the road will receive an asphalt overlay from Ward Drive to Silverton Road.

    The road will remain open with flaggers directing traffic through the work area. Motorists should expect short delays and are advised to use alternate routes.  When traveling through the work area, please remain alert, follow flagger instructions and be considerate of pedestrians, bicyclists, and construction workers.

    For additional information, contact Tina Powell, Office Specialist, or Shane Ottosen Jr, Project Engineer, at 503-588-5036

    Read More
  • County adds safety measures to McKay Road corridor

    County adds safety measures to McKay Road corridor

    Date: 12/12/2019 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Public Works

    ​This article appears in the Dec. 12, 2019, edition of the Newberg Graphic. 

    By Dick Hughes
    Newberg Graphic contributor

    If you recently traveled McKay Road you likely saw lots of cars – and some improvements to make the two-lane road safer.

    "The county receives citizen requests for road improvements all the time," county Public Works Director Brian Nicholas said. "Now, we're making new investments to enhance the McKay Road corridor. The enhancements we're making have been shown to reduce the types of accidents we see on McKay Road."

    The corridor is actually three rural roads that over time merged into one, with each maintaining its original name – McKay, Yergen and Ehlen roads. That corridor has become one of the county's top concerns for traffic safety.

    Most crashes on McKay Road occur along the roughly five-mile stretch between Highway 219 and Interstate 5. The maximum speed is 55 mph and drops lower near the freeway, but the Marion County Sheriff's Office (MCSO) has clocked drivers doing more than 90 mph.

    "Those roads were designed as country roads and they're being treated as highways," Sheriff Joe Kast said. "That's the biggest problem, just getting people to slow down. Whenever there's a gap in the traffic, some of these cars are just flying."

    Some crashes occur at intersections, apparently because motorists entering from side roads do not see the oncoming traffic or do not recognize how fast those vehicles are moving. Another major source of crashes has been vehicles veering out of their lanes.

    "Any little mistake at high speed can become a big mistake," Kast said. The county public works department is collaborating with the MCSO to enhance safety on the corridor. The county has installed centerline rumble strips and other striping from Highway 219 to Aurora. Larger 55 mph speed signs are being added as well and the county will test providing vehicle speed feedback on some signs.

    New signs have been installed on the side roads as they approach the road, including larger stop signs at intersections and large "Stop Ahead" signs. All are highly reflective, as are new pavement markings showing where vehicles should stop. Some intersections also have "Cross Traffic Does Not Stop" warnings.

    The county has ordered flashing beacons to install where needed. In addition, more of the corridor will be designated as "No Passing" zones.

    Longer-term improvements will include installing reflectors at curves and guardrails, widening the fog lines, adding turnouts for slow-moving vehicles, creating left-turn pockets at some intersections and reconstructing other intersections.

    During the 2019 session, the Legislature tasked the Oregon Department of Transportation with launching a county level safety corridor pilot program through the passage of House Bill 3213. Once that becomes available, Nicholas said, Marion County will seek a safety corridor designation for McKay Road, which would allow additional signs and doubling of traffic fines.

    "The number of serious accidents that have occurred on McKay Road over the last two years would qualify the road for safety corridor designation under ODOT's current guidelines," Nicholas said.

    The MCSO has run saturation patrols along the corridor and found that many of the drivers were from outside the area, possibly cutting through Marion County as a shortcut between Interstate 5 and the relatively new Newberg-Dundee bypass in Yamhill County. The sheriff's office has been expanding its social media presence to warn those motorists against driving too fast.

    "I don't think anything is worth traveling those speeds for," Kast said. "There's a lot of activity up there – farm activity, residents that live up there, there's kids up there. And driving those speeds is just too much risk. It's extremely dangerous."

    For people who witness dangerous driving, Kast has this advice: "If someone's driving in a manner that's dangerous and looks like it's going to cause crashes, we would recommend they call 9-1-1. This will allow dispatch to notify the sheriff's office and any other nearby agencies as well."

    Read More
  • County agreement enables infrastructure for rural family farms

    County agreement enables infrastructure for rural family farms

    Date: 12/18/2019 12:00:00 AM
    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​By Danielle Gonzalez, Economic Development Management Analyst

    It is not often that Marion County can improve the infrastructure experience of businesses and residents by nearly 1,000%. However, a broadband fiber project currently underway is doing just that in an agriculturally rich area of unincorporated Marion County. At the Dec. 4, 2019, Board Session, commissioners approved a cost sharing agreement with DataVision,  a north county internet service provider, to connect 47 rural farm, business, and residential properties to 1 Gbps symmetrical broadband fiber.

    Through Oregon video lottery proceeds the county receives for economic development purposes, $150,000 will be contributed to expand the number of properties connected and speed up implementation of the DataVision project along Wheatland and Matheny Roads. Under the agreement, the county also negotiated additional dark fiber out to the Wheatland Ferry for potential future use.

    Local farmer and business owner Tony Weathers was on hand to detail the impact of this project to his business. He thanked Marion County and DataVision for their help and said, "I am three miles north of Keizer and I am on dial-up internet." In this area of the county, businesses reported internet download speeds of 1.5 Mbps. Weathers said the lack of internet makes things like paying payroll taxes online, tracking overseas commodity markets, and surveillance applications for his business nearly impossible.

    To help reduce the cost of the overall project, farmers will utilize their farm equipment to dig their own trenches from the public right-of-way to their homes and buildings. Commissioner Colm Willis said, "I love this project. The farmers are contributing, DataVision is doing their part, and we are doing our part. This is the perfect economic development project."

    DataVision President and CEO Renee Willer said the Gervais-based company has been in business since 1914 and serves hazelnut, hops, and nursery growers in the region. She said, "It is these public-private partnerships that are going to help to get the job done in these rural communities. We are thrilled to be able to partner with Marion County to bring fiber broadband to this group of rural business owners and residents."

    The county's interest in the project began after a discussion with a rural farmer just outside of Gervais who received a quote of $56,000 to connect the family farm to broadband fiber. Broadband fiber is an essential infrastructure for rural and agricultural communities to be economically competitive. The viability of small farms depends on efficiencies and precision agricultural applications. Gigabit internet service is required for advanced farming applications such as GPS enabled water use, chemical use monitoring software, and surveillance asset protection.

    The cost sharing agreement provides a benefit to all of the parties involved — rural property owners receive the internet service they desperately need, DataVision gets customers, and the county has a reduced future expense for internet service. Commissioner Kevin Cameron said, "This is just a sample of what we hope happens on a broader scale in our rural communities. We have a lot of more work to do." 

    Read More
 

Select a department:

  • Jan
    14

    North Fork Park is closed due to snow

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    ​MEHAMA, OR – Marion County Parks announces that North Fork Park has closed due to the recent snow storm. The park, which is located on North Fork Road in the Santiam Canyon, has received several inches of snow during the storm and will remain closed until further notice.  

    For more information about this and other Marion County Parks, visit the website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Parks/, email parks@co.marion.or.us, or call 503-588-5036.

    Read More
    North Fork Park is closed due to snow
  • Jan
    7

    Veteran Service Office making a difference for local veterans

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​This article appears in the January 2020 issue of Salem Business Journal. 

    By Dick Hughes, special to Marion County

    James Riddle tells the story of a Marion County veteran whose claim for federal health benefits had been denied.

    As a military police officer, the man wore a duty belt that was quite heavy. He later developed leg issues but the VA contended his condition did not stem from his military service.

    Riddle, the lead veterans service officer (VSO) for Marion County, dug into the science and found scientific research that backed the veteran's claim. The VA accepted the claim. Two weeks later, another VSO in the Marion County Veteran Service Office also used that research to back a veteran's claim.

    "We work outside the boxes," Riddle said. "We try to connect things that others have missed."

    The result is a powerful collaboration that has brought millions of dollars to veterans, families and survivors since the office opened in June 2018.

    "The county commissioners are dedicated to making sure the veterans in Marion County are served. They are committed to this program being successful," said Lisa Trauernicht, a senior policy analyst with the Board of Commissioners.

    It's a busy office, starting with two VSOs and adding a third. The staff met with an average of 100 veterans a week during the last half of 2019, they already plan to expand their outreach, especially in the Santiam Canyon.

    Trauernicht helps oversee the county's contract with Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency, which runs the program and employs the staff. "They are an immensely dedicated, passionate group of people," she said. "Their stories are amazing."

    Sara Webb is Community Action's program manager. The staff members are veterans: VSOs Tim Boykin, Army; Eddie Grainger, Marines; and Riddle, both Navy and Army; and veteran service specialist Chris Dyer, Air Force.

    Marion was the last county to get its own office. The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs, through its headquarters in Salem, historically had served the capital area.

    Working with government but not being "of the government" can be an advantage at times. Riddle encountered a veteran who'd never applied for benefits because the last time he entered a government building, he was sent to Vietnam. But he accepted Riddle's assistance.

    Services are free. They include filing disability claims; filing for pensions; obtaining military records; and applying for VA health care, education, and surviving spouse benefits. However, the office is not involved in setting up VA medical appointments or anything like that.

    Grainger said some veterans fear that applying for mental health benefits will affect their ability to get a job. That is not the case and, he said, it is OK to get help.

    The benefits can be life-changing, whether money to pay for hearing aids, for medical treatment or for long-term care. Yet many veterans, especially women, don't realize they are veterans and potentially eligible for benefits. When discharged, many servicemembers were misinformed about their status.

    "We encourage every veteran to check," Boykin said. "It's that question that goes unanswered if you never ask."

    A lot well-intended but inaccurate information circulates via social media and elsewhere. Webb stresses the best place to get up-to-date answers is a county veterans service office. To be certified by the ODVA, every county VSO must undergo a year of training. And stay constantly attuned.

    "There's a lot. The VA changes almost daily. I thought I knew what I was getting myself into when I started," Riddle said. "The analogy I use is, I'm out in left field, I'm ready to play, I got my hat, I got my glove – but we're playing hockey. That's the difference from going from client to officer. It's a completely different game."

    But that knowledge is powerful. From January 2018 through mid-December 2019, the VSOs helped Marion County veterans claim new monthly awards of $1,680,969.50 and retroactive awards of $4,077,633.52.

    "I spent 20 years serving in the Marine Corps and serving my country," Grainger said, "and it's nice that I'm in a role where I can still serve."

    -----------

    Location & Hours

    Veteran Service Office of Marion County
    780 Commercial St. SE, Ste. 302, Salem, OR
    (971) 707-4400
    info.vso@mwvcaa.org 

    Office hours
    Walk-in service: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday:  9 -11 a.m., 1- 4p.m.
    Thursday-Friday: Only front desk staff is available

    Off-site locations
    First working Monday of the month: Woodburn Estates & Golf, 1776 Country Club Rd., Woodburn, OR 97071
    Third working Monday of the month: Santiam Outreach Community Center, 280 NE Santiam Blvd., Mill City, OR 97360

    What to bring to your first visit, if possible:
    DD214 form
    Photos showing where you served
    Medical records
    Diagnosis of any sort

    Read More
    Veteran Service Office making a difference for local veterans
  • Dec
    20

    Construction project will bring improvements to 45th Avenue

    Posted by: Public Works

    ​SALEM OR – Marion County has contracted Carter & Company to begin construction on 45th Avenue beginning January 13, 2020. The project will be constructed in several stages and is estimated to be completed in 2021.

    The project will widen the road to accommodate bike lanes, add a turn lane at Fire Protection Way, construct missing sidewalk sections and ramps, and upgrade the stormwater system.  Once construction is complete, the road will receive an asphalt overlay from Ward Drive to Silverton Road.

    The road will remain open with flaggers directing traffic through the work area. Motorists should expect short delays and are advised to use alternate routes.  When traveling through the work area, please remain alert, follow flagger instructions and be considerate of pedestrians, bicyclists, and construction workers.

    For additional information, contact Tina Powell, Office Specialist, or Shane Ottosen Jr, Project Engineer, at 503-588-5036

    Read More
    Construction project will bring improvements to 45th Avenue
  • Dec
    18

    County agreement enables infrastructure for rural family farms

    Posted by: Board of Commissioners Office

    ​By Danielle Gonzalez, Economic Development Management Analyst

    It is not often that Marion County can improve the infrastructure experience of businesses and residents by nearly 1,000%. However, a broadband fiber project currently underway is doing just that in an agriculturally rich area of unincorporated Marion County. At the Dec. 4, 2019, Board Session, commissioners approved a cost sharing agreement with DataVision,  a north county internet service provider, to connect 47 rural farm, business, and residential properties to 1 Gbps symmetrical broadband fiber.

    Through Oregon video lottery proceeds the county receives for economic development purposes, $150,000 will be contributed to expand the number of properties connected and speed up implementation of the DataVision project along Wheatland and Matheny Roads. Under the agreement, the county also negotiated additional dark fiber out to the Wheatland Ferry for potential future use.

    Local farmer and business owner Tony Weathers was on hand to detail the impact of this project to his business. He thanked Marion County and DataVision for their help and said, "I am three miles north of Keizer and I am on dial-up internet." In this area of the county, businesses reported internet download speeds of 1.5 Mbps. Weathers said the lack of internet makes things like paying payroll taxes online, tracking overseas commodity markets, and surveillance applications for his business nearly impossible.

    To help reduce the cost of the overall project, farmers will utilize their farm equipment to dig their own trenches from the public right-of-way to their homes and buildings. Commissioner Colm Willis said, "I love this project. The farmers are contributing, DataVision is doing their part, and we are doing our part. This is the perfect economic development project."

    DataVision President and CEO Renee Willer said the Gervais-based company has been in business since 1914 and serves hazelnut, hops, and nursery growers in the region. She said, "It is these public-private partnerships that are going to help to get the job done in these rural communities. We are thrilled to be able to partner with Marion County to bring fiber broadband to this group of rural business owners and residents."

    The county's interest in the project began after a discussion with a rural farmer just outside of Gervais who received a quote of $56,000 to connect the family farm to broadband fiber. Broadband fiber is an essential infrastructure for rural and agricultural communities to be economically competitive. The viability of small farms depends on efficiencies and precision agricultural applications. Gigabit internet service is required for advanced farming applications such as GPS enabled water use, chemical use monitoring software, and surveillance asset protection.

    The cost sharing agreement provides a benefit to all of the parties involved — rural property owners receive the internet service they desperately need, DataVision gets customers, and the county has a reduced future expense for internet service. Commissioner Kevin Cameron said, "This is just a sample of what we hope happens on a broader scale in our rural communities. We have a lot of more work to do." 

    Read More
    County agreement enables infrastructure for rural family farms
  • Dec
    12

    County adds safety measures to McKay Road corridor

    Posted by: Public Works

    ​This article appears in the Dec. 12, 2019, edition of the Newberg Graphic. 

    By Dick Hughes
    Newberg Graphic contributor

    If you recently traveled McKay Road you likely saw lots of cars – and some improvements to make the two-lane road safer.

    "The county receives citizen requests for road improvements all the time," county Public Works Director Brian Nicholas said. "Now, we're making new investments to enhance the McKay Road corridor. The enhancements we're making have been shown to reduce the types of accidents we see on McKay Road."

    The corridor is actually three rural roads that over time merged into one, with each maintaining its original name – McKay, Yergen and Ehlen roads. That corridor has become one of the county's top concerns for traffic safety.

    Most crashes on McKay Road occur along the roughly five-mile stretch between Highway 219 and Interstate 5. The maximum speed is 55 mph and drops lower near the freeway, but the Marion County Sheriff's Office (MCSO) has clocked drivers doing more than 90 mph.

    "Those roads were designed as country roads and they're being treated as highways," Sheriff Joe Kast said. "That's the biggest problem, just getting people to slow down. Whenever there's a gap in the traffic, some of these cars are just flying."

    Some crashes occur at intersections, apparently because motorists entering from side roads do not see the oncoming traffic or do not recognize how fast those vehicles are moving. Another major source of crashes has been vehicles veering out of their lanes.

    "Any little mistake at high speed can become a big mistake," Kast said. The county public works department is collaborating with the MCSO to enhance safety on the corridor. The county has installed centerline rumble strips and other striping from Highway 219 to Aurora. Larger 55 mph speed signs are being added as well and the county will test providing vehicle speed feedback on some signs.

    New signs have been installed on the side roads as they approach the road, including larger stop signs at intersections and large "Stop Ahead" signs. All are highly reflective, as are new pavement markings showing where vehicles should stop. Some intersections also have "Cross Traffic Does Not Stop" warnings.

    The county has ordered flashing beacons to install where needed. In addition, more of the corridor will be designated as "No Passing" zones.

    Longer-term improvements will include installing reflectors at curves and guardrails, widening the fog lines, adding turnouts for slow-moving vehicles, creating left-turn pockets at some intersections and reconstructing other intersections.

    During the 2019 session, the Legislature tasked the Oregon Department of Transportation with launching a county level safety corridor pilot program through the passage of House Bill 3213. Once that becomes available, Nicholas said, Marion County will seek a safety corridor designation for McKay Road, which would allow additional signs and doubling of traffic fines.

    "The number of serious accidents that have occurred on McKay Road over the last two years would qualify the road for safety corridor designation under ODOT's current guidelines," Nicholas said.

    The MCSO has run saturation patrols along the corridor and found that many of the drivers were from outside the area, possibly cutting through Marion County as a shortcut between Interstate 5 and the relatively new Newberg-Dundee bypass in Yamhill County. The sheriff's office has been expanding its social media presence to warn those motorists against driving too fast.

    "I don't think anything is worth traveling those speeds for," Kast said. "There's a lot of activity up there – farm activity, residents that live up there, there's kids up there. And driving those speeds is just too much risk. It's extremely dangerous."

    For people who witness dangerous driving, Kast has this advice: "If someone's driving in a manner that's dangerous and looks like it's going to cause crashes, we would recommend they call 9-1-1. This will allow dispatch to notify the sheriff's office and any other nearby agencies as well."

    Read More
    County adds safety measures to McKay Road corridor
  • Dec
    6

    Salmon Falls Park has closed for the season

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    ​MEHAMA, OR – Marion County Parks announces that Salmon Falls Park has closed for the season. The park, which is located on North Fork Road in the Santiam Canyon, will reopen in spring 2020.  

    For more information about this and other Marion County Parks, visit the website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Parks/, email parks@co.marion.or.us, or call 503-588-5036.

    Read More
    Salmon Falls Park has closed for the season
  • Dec
    5

    Student Recycle Art Calendar Awardees Announced

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    ​Fourteen students from Marion County received awards for their artwork in the Student Recycle Art Calendar Contest. Awardees were honored at the Marion County Board of Commissioners meeting on Wednesday, December 4, 2019, and were chosen from student submissions received from throughout Marion County.

    In an effort to promote waste reduction and resource conservation in local schools, Marion County Public Works - Environmental Services and Mid-Valley Garbage & Recycling Association partner to create the annual Student Recycle Art Calendar contest.

    The committee selected the winners based not only on their artistic ability, but also on the content of their message. Fourteen students in several grade categories were awarded a gift card, certificate, and art set. The 2020 art calendar award winners are:

    • Ashley Vargas Galeno, Washington Elementary School (Salem-Keizer)
    • McKenna Morales, Waldo Middle School
    • Makayla Meleason, Sprague High School
    • Arvin Singh, Abiqua Academy
    • Bradlee Mounts, Wright Elementary School 
    • Dani Colby, Abiqua Academy
    • Dharaa Mungra, Abiqua Academy
    • Jax Marshall, Aumsville Elementary School
    • Helena Navarro, Hallman Elementary School
    • James Dolan, Abiqua Academy
    • Isabel Blackburn, Abiqua Academy
    • Sandra Montanez, Woodburn High School
    • Chloe Elmore, Sprague High School
    • Kate Swenson, Sprague High School 

    This year we also recognize Sprague High School's art teacher, Connie Toland. Kate Swenson, one of Ms. Toland's students, was chosen as the grand prize winner. We realize that teachers play a critical role in making this contest a big success and we recognize their hard work. 

    Calendars are free and available by visiting Marion County Public Works at 5155 Silverton Road NE, Salem, Oregon or by calling Mid-Valley Garbage & Recycling Association at 503-390-4000.

    Read More
    Student Recycle Art Calendar Awardees Announced
  • Sep
    16

    St. Louis Fish Ponds Park to close for the season

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    GERVAIS, OR – Marion County Parks announces that the St. Louis Fish Ponds Park near Gervais will close for the season on October 1, 2019.

    Hunters and fishermen are still allowed to fish, hunt, and train dogs at the park during the off-season but should be aware that they must walk in after parking their vehicles at the gate and that no restroom facilities are available.

    For more information, please call 503-588-5036, email parks@co.marion.or.us, or visit the park's web page at http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Parks/descriptions/Pages/stlouisponds.aspx.

    For more information about fishing and gun use at the park, please contact the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife at odfw.info@state.or.us or 503-947-6100.

    Read More
    St. Louis Fish Ponds Park to close for the season
  • Sep
    12

    Bear Creek Park and Campground closes early for the season

    Posted by: Public Works - Environmental Services

    ​MEHAMA, OR – Marion County Parks announces that Bear Creek Park and Campground will close on Monday, September 16, 2019.  The park is typically open until October 31 but this year the camp host departed ahead of schedule and county staff opted to close the park because of safety and security concerns. The park will reopen on May 1, 2020.  

    The county also wants to remind the public that parking fee collection on North Fork Road will end on September 16. The seasonal parking fees are enforced May 15 through September 15, and collection will resume in May 2020.

    For more information about this and other Marion County Parks, visit the website at http://www.co.marion.or.us/PW/Parks/, email parks@co.marion.or.us, or call 503-588-5036.

    Read More
    Bear Creek Park and Campground closes early for the season
​​